Research News

  • Stressed Out Interferons Reveal Potential Key to Alternative Lupus Treatment
    Only one new drug has become available over the past 50 years for the estimated 1.5 million Americans and five million-plus people worldwide suffering from lupus, but new research has identified a previously unknown mechanism involved in the immune response that could provide an alternative therapy target.
  • American Heart Month: Zakai Research Q&A on Populations Most at Risk for Vascular Disease
    The following interview with Neil Zakai, M.D., M.Sc., associate professor of medicine at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont, originally appeared on the Facebook page of the Thrombosis and Haemostasis journal and focused on his research publication, titled “D-dimer and the Risk of Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS),” which was pre-published online in December 2016. (Key: TH = Thrombosis and Haemostasis; NZ = Neil Zakai)
  • Littenberg & Chopan’s Study Finds Association between Eating Hot Peppers and Decreased Mortality
    Like spicy food? If so, you might live longer, say researchers at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont, who found that consumption of hot red chili peppers is associated with a 13 percent reduction in total mortality – primarily in deaths due to heart disease or stroke – in a large prospective study.
  • Cushman Named Editor-in-Chief of New International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis-Wiley Journal
    On January 10, 2017, the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH), in partnership with John Wiley and Sons, Inc., announced the launch of the Society’s new open access journal, Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis (RPTH), with its inaugural issue to publish in conjunction with the meeting of the ISTH 2017 Congress in Berlin, Germany, which will take place July 8 to 13, 2017.
  • Dixon among 2016 UVM Medical Group Excellence in Education and Research Awardees
    The 2016 University of Vermont (UVM) Medical Group awards for excellence in education and research – along with grants funding research in medicine and medical education – were presented at the practice’s annual holiday reception on December 13, 2016.
  • Holmes Discusses Using Genetics to Predict Clot Risk
    Among the side effects experienced by cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy is a higher risk of blood clots, but determining which patients are most likely to get them is a challenge for physicians.
  • Sigmon Reports on Study of Waitlisted Opioid-Dependent Adults in NEJM
    In rural states like Vermont, opioid-dependent adults desperate for treatment often find themselves stuck on a wait list, sometimes for eight months or more, increasing their risk of continuing to use illicit opioids, contract an infectious disease, overdose and prematurely die.
  • Janssen-Heininger Receives Inaugural NHLBI Outstanding Investigator Award
    Antioxidant therapies may hold promise for the nearly 25 million Americans suffering from asthma, and additional 140,000 people diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis, but to date, determining exactly how to modify them into a feasible treatment has proved challenging.
  • Shaw and VCHIP Partner with UCSF on $13 Million Children’s Quality Measures Study
    The Vermont Child Health Improvement Program (VCHIP) and Judith Shaw, Ed.D., M.P.H., R.N., executive director of the VCHIP and University of Vermont professor of pediatrics and nursing, will play a significant role in a $13.4 million multicenter pediatric quality measures study funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).
  • Ades Study Supports Road Map to Saving Lives through Cardiac Rehab
    More than two million Americans experience some type of a cardiac event every year. Whether they’ve had a heart attack or coronary revascularization procedure, such as bypass surgery or coronary stent placement, doctors typically recommended these patients participate in Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) as outpatients.