Medical Research Excellence

Research funding at the Larner College of Medicine has increased 300 percent in the last decade, to more than $82 million annually. Today, researchers in laboratory, clinical and community settings work to bring greater understanding of disease and wellness, and new, more effective treatments in key areas such as:

  • Cancer Research
  • Cardiovascular Research
  • Health Services Research and Education, Outcomes Research, and Quality Improvement
  • Immunobiology & Infectious Disease Research
  • Metabolic Research
  • Neuroscience Research
  • Pulmonary Research

Learn more about our research programs >>


Meet our Scientists

20170419_mullen_02Meet a Scientist: Patrick Mullen

Cells grown in a petri dish behave differently than cells that reside in a human being or animal. In order to help bridge the divide between these two worlds and gain a better understanding of what causes disease, Patrick Mullen works in both, comparing results he sees in the lab of Christopher Francklyn, Ph.D., an expert in protein synthesis enzymes, with animal studies conducted in the lab of Alicia Ebert, Ph.D., a biology professor known for her work with zebrafish. Read more >>

NEW! Internal Funding Opportunities

A new pilot research funding opportunity targeting health services research is now available, with a maximum of two $50,000 grants awarded. The application deadline is May 1, 2017. 
LEARN MORE >> 


Recent News


Budd to Deliver Research Laureate Lecture on Lupus May 9

20170227_Dr_Ralph_BuddLarner College of Medicine Research Laureate and University Distinguished Professor of Medicine Ralph Budd, M.D., will present the inaugural Research Laureate Lecture on May 9, 2017 at 4:30 p.m. in the Sullivan Classroom in the Medical Education Center. His talk is titled “The El Greco Lesson: 33 Years of Thinking Lupus.”  Read more >>


Research Spotlight

  • Electrical “switch” in brain’s capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow
    April 25, 2017
    All it takes is the flip of a protein “switch” within the tiny wire-like capillaries of the brain to increase the blood flow that ensures optimal brain function. New research has uncovered that capillaries have the capacity to both sense brain activity and generate an electrical vasodilatory signal to evoke blood flow and direct nutrients to nourish hard-working neurons.